The Olympics are coming to Los Angeles in 2028 and that is great news for the construction industry. At the top of the list for projects timed to support the Summer Games set to start seven years from now is a grab bag of light rail, subway and highway work from the Los Angeles Metropolitan Transportation Authority (METRO). 

Well, we didn’t say it was easy, just there was a lot of opportunity. D More than $50 billion dollars is set aside for these projects, mostly Measure M and Measure R money (sales tax for infrastructure supported by ECA), along with anticipated state and federal funding to support the Games. 

The Twenty-Eight by ’28 initiative highlights 28 Metro projects for potential completion by the 2028 Summer Olympic and Paralympic Games. Some of the projects on the list are already underway and will be completed well before 2028. At least eight other jobs are being “accelerated,” in Metro’s terminology, to add capacity and ease congestion in time to make L. A.’s third Olympic pageant (1932, 1984 were our prior Olympiads) more enjoyable. 

You can see the project lis at://media.metro.net/projects_studies/resources/images/att_a_28x28_list.pdf

Metro is aware this high level of construction activity in a relatively short period of time is going to require extra outreach to contractors who are not currently in their databases. There is an entire section on their website dedicated to supplying information to contractors interested in or already doing business with them at //business.metro.net/

As with all big organizations there is some paperwork and a lot of regulations, three in particular are pretty stringent about how to communicate with the agency, including:

  • Vendors may not engage project managers in any discussion regarding the subject procurement unless the vendor is a registered lobbyist.
  • Vendors may not contact the project managers during the “blackout period.” The communication blackout period shall commence when (1) the procurements solicitation documentation is issued and shall continue until staff makes public the recommendation for award; and (2) when a protest on the recommendation or procurement is filed with Metro and continue until the notice of determination is issued by Metro. Contacting the project managers during the blackout period may lead to the vendor’s debarment. 
  •  In order to avoid an organizational conflict of interest, a vendor may not participate in competition for a Metro procurement if that vendor developed or assisted in developing any part of a specification, requirement, statement of work, invitation for bid and/or request for proposal on that same procurement.

Well, we didn’t say it was easy, just there was a lot of opportunity.

By Garrett Francis, ECA President Email: [email protected]